General

Learn about buying property at Sheriff's Sale

The Office of the Sheriff offers monthly workshops – one conducted in the Spanish language and one in the English language – on How to Buy Property at a Philadelphia Sheriff’s Sale. Subjects covered in both sessions include the amount of money and required documents to secure a winning bid, what is the right of redemption and how that might impact a buyer’s purchase, and why it is important to make a visit to the site before you bid on a property.

Sign up for one of our upcoming serminars, conducted in English or in Spanish by clicking here.

Here Sheriff Jewell Williams (left) greets participants in a May session with moderator and Deputy Sheriff Mark Parsons answering questions.  In the second photo, participants of the May Workshop listen as Deputy Sheriff Mark Parsons explains the bidding process and offers tips on how to be a knowledgeable bidder.
 

Engaging with the Community

Approaching the summer of my second year as the elected Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County, I, like most, am looking forward to the warmer weather and the many activities (most of them free) sponsored by the city and/or other organizations.

The sheriff’s office is also sponsoring a number of free informational workshops and seminars this summer on everything from how to buy at a sheriff’s sale, to things you can do to stop your home from foreclosure.

We’ve already partnered with folks in the African and Caribbean community to provide information to about 200 people at St. Cyprian’s Catholic Church on Cobbs Creek Parkway, immediately following an April Sunday Mass.

Most recently we teamed up with El Concilio (council of Latin speaking organizations) and El Sol, a local Spanish language newspaper to present a workshop at 7th & Fairmont that addressed the rising number of foreclosures in this community and how to possibly bring those numbers down.

Councilwoman Maria D. Quinones-Sanchez was also there to offer information about AVI and stress the importance of workshops like ours to help those in need of advice, and/or, counseling from a mortgage foreclosure expert.

We will also be supporting clean up efforts throughout the city this summer, as well as host a number of informational seminars and workshops at places of worship, recreation centers and banquet halls across the city.

I recently read a report called Collateral Damage: The Spillover Costs of Foreclosures by Debbie Bruenstein Bocian, Peter Smith and Wei Li. The report gave some very somber statistics that stated: “Between 2007 and 2011, 10.9 million homes went into foreclosure” across the country.

The report went on to say that these foreclosures “not only have harmed the families that experienced them, they also have had the negative effects that extend to the neighborhood, community and wider economy”.

In other words, when a house goes into foreclosure, there is a ripple effect that impacts the block, and even the entire neighborhood.

My office understands the dynamics of this, which is why you will see us this summer offering encouragement and even muscle to street cleaning events, community gardens, job fairs, and free medical tests.

The complexities that lead to a foreclosure are often small in the beginning, but grow large and unstoppable because of apathy and a lack of knowledge. This, in turn, kicks in the sense of hopelessness because there seems to be no way out of their situation.

As my office continues to offer assistance in the form of advice and referrals, I sincerely hope that those who need help will take advantage of this information and share it as often as necessary.

I believe that a stable and aesthetically pleasing community is a large part of the incentive for folks to understand the importance of keeping up with mortgage payments.

After all, if you like where you live, you will want to stay where you live. 

Topping Off Ceremony at New Family/Juvenile Courthouse at 1501 Arch

On May 2, 2013 members of the staff of the Office of the Sheriff and city dignitaries gathered to watch the "Raising of Top Beam" ceremony celebrated at the new Family Court building in Philadelphia. The new 15-story, 51,000 square-foot building will unify the city’s juvenile court and its domestic-relations division at 1501 Arch when it opens in June, 2014.

(From Left) Chief Deputy Kevin Lamb, Special Consultant John Keaveney (Retired Captain Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office), Pennsylvania Supreme Court Chief Justice Ron Castille, Chief of Staff Bob Jackson, and Lt. Richard Verrecchio.

Sheriff Jewell Williams Welcomes The New Bike and K-9 Units To The Office; Recognizes Special Units With Badges and Certificates

Sheriff Jewell Williams joined several of his top officers to officially welcome three canines (Carter, Blair and Jimmy) to the Office of the Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County, that will be trained to sniff out bombs and narcotics.

The three dogs—donated to the sheriff’s office by James Binns, Philadelphia lawyer and philanthropist—are about a year old and will form the newly created K-9 Unit.  Their handlers are Deputy Sheriff’s Barry Johnson, William O’Leary and Andrew Ortiz.

The dogs, named after the grandchildren of Binns, made their first public appearance on recently during ceremonies at the Citizens Bank Park to also recognize the  newly formed Bike Patrol Unit, and awarded badges and pins to the Special Operations Group, Honor Guard Unit, and Homeland Security.

The event was hosted by Sheriff Williams, Staff Inspector Paris Washington and Lt. Roy B. Herbert.

“I want to especially thank Jimmy Binns,” said Sheriff Williams, “for his extreme generosity and for the support he has shown myself and these officers over the past several years”.

The Special Operations Group honored at recent ceremonies at Citizens Bank Park consisted of :

Standing—(left to right)—DSO Willard Rozier, DSO Ronald Jones, DSO Bilin Carera, Deputy Sheriff Sergeant Robert Castelli,   Sheriff Chief of Staff Robert Jackson, Deputy Sheriff Lt. Vernon Muse, CFO Benjamin Hyllar, Sheriff Jewell Williams, Chief Sheriff Deputy Kevin Lamb, DSO Bryan Dixon, DSO Virginia Killman, DSO Paris Davenport.

Kneeling—(left to right)—DSO George Morse, DSO Kevin Butler, DSO Andrew Ortiz.

 

 

 

The newly created Bike Patrol Unit was recognized and given certificates of merit to mark the admission of this unit into the Office of the Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County. 

Standing—(from left to right)—DSO Arnelio Alanguillan, Deputy Sheriff Sergeant Robert Castelli, DSO Marcus Morris, DSO Jennifer Burrell, DSO Craig Palmer, DSO Phil Belton, Sheriff Chief of Staff Robert Jackson, DSO John McCleary, James Binns, Sheriff Jewell Williams, Deputy Sheriff Sergeant Michael Bastone, Deputy Sheriff Lt. Monte Guess.

Kneeling—(left to right)—DSO  Vance Robinson, DSO Roberto Cosme

Sheriff Williams Recognizes Child Abuse Prevention Month

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, a time officially set aside by President Barak Obama for special consideration of one of the most vulnerable groups in America.

The subject permeates every level of our society and crosses all racial, political and religious boundaries and it comes in many forms.

From physical abuse, to neglect, to the type of emotional abuse that leaves them with low self-esteem and a growing resentment of authority.

It also touches my office because it is the children who suffer as much as anyone when a family loses a home for one reason or another.

The stress it creates, as mentioned last year in the journal Pediatrics, can lead to child abuse as parents manifest their frustrations in the form of physical assaults on their own children.

The children become victims again when they are forced to physically leave their home and move in with relatives, or another, probably less desirable home, or even a shelter.

As Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County, the above scenario is one my office bends over backwards to prevent.

We sponsor mortgage foreclosure workshops across the city and invite any entity we feel can address some aspect of the myriad of reasons that lead to a family losing their home.

From immigration officials, to health experts offering advice on everything from high blood pressure to diabetes and heart disease.

If you are sick, you can’t work, and if you can’t work, you can’t pay your mortgage.

At a workshop in West Philadelphia recently we had more than 250 members of the Caribbean and African community come together at St. Cyprian’s where we spoke in detail on different programs and hotlines available to help keep people in their homes.

Among the informational vendors were representatives from health care agencies, immigration, and certified mortgage counselors offering valuable advice for free.

On May 4th we will host another such workshop at The Council of Spanish Speaking Organizations (Concilio) at 705-709 N. Franklin Street from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in partnership with El Sol, a Spanish language newspaper and will repeat this scenario in other neighborhoods throughout the city at least once a month for the rest of the year.

I have always believed that education is a powerful deterrent to hopelessness and ignorance.

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