This article was originally posted at https://6abc.com/fugitives-rounded-up-after-overnight-raid-in-philadelphia/4042679/

By Katherine Scott

Friday, August 24, 2018 01:32PM

PHILADELPHIA (WPVI) --

A citywide raid that landed more than a dozen wanted fugitives in police custody overnight.

Law enforcement fanned out across Philadelphia, rounding up 17 people as part of Operation Night Sweep.

"Today is a good day for the City of Philadelphia," said Sheriff Jewell Williams.

Officials say some of the suspects tried to avoid capture by unscrewing lightbulbs to create darkness or attempted to hide.

Philadelphia enlisted help from law enforcement from Bucks, Chester, and Delaware counties, as well as state and city police.

 

Sheriff Williams said his office is out serving warrants every day, but a concentrated effort like this helps chip away at the massive backlog of cases.

The charges against the alleged fugitives include robbery, gun violations, drug offenses and aggravated assault.

Some were arrested for civil matters, such as delinquent child support. This raid could potentially net more than $168,000 in outstanding child support, right in time for the school year.

"We know the school year starts on Monday in the city of Philadelphia, and we want to see these parents get some of that money that they deserve to have for child support and custody matters," said Williams.

There are many more wanted, the sheriff says. Often people turn themselves in after seeing the news of one of these sweeps to avoid the embarrassment of being caught up in the next one.

Video and original story can be found here: https://6abc.com/society/fun-day-brings-brewerytown-community-together-despite-gun-violence-/3993358/

 

Find the original article by Bastiaan Slabbers here https://whyy.org/articles/juneteenth-a-vibrant-celebration-of-freedom/. To translate, please visit Google Translate and select your language.

The rhythm of African drums swelled and bounced off Center City high rises as floats rounded City Hall on Saturday during the annual Juneteenth parade, commemorating the announcement of the abolition of slavery on June 19, 1865.

For the third year, floats rolled from City Hall to Penn’s Landing in a vibrant celebration of African culture and traditions. Participant Leighdy Morris, Queen of the RBG Brigade, said the celebration should be a national holiday similar to the Fourth of July.

On the second float of the parade a band performed the Redemption Song by Bob Marley. A few light drops of rain did not seem to hinder the participants as they made their way over the parade route.

Among the participants in the parade were Kenneth Gamble of music producing duo Gamble & Huff, Congressman Dwight Evans, Sheriff Jewell Williams, students, Police Explorer cadets, dance and performance ensembles, and many others.

This was written in English. For a translation, please visit Google Translate and select your language.

June 23, 2018 — Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams and the Sheriff’s Office Color Guard helped to lead the Philadelphia Juneteenth parade and launched his annual “Summer of Peace” at the Juneteenth Festival this weekend.

The Sheriff is encouraging young people to stay away from all forms of violence. At “pop-ups” and outreach events throughout the summer, the Office will give away free gunlocks and offer children and adults an opportunity to take a “gun safety” pledge to make sure all firearms in the home are safely secured. On social media, the office is promoting an antiviolence message: “Let's talk it out. Don’t shoot it out”. Citizens of all ages and all parts of our city can help to spread the message through short videos that will be posted on the Sheriff Office Facebook pages.

“We all love the summer: the sunshine, vacations, barbeque, time with friends and family. But I want to encourage our young people to have a peaceful summer and stay away from the conflicts that lead to tragic and senseless violence. So let’s talk it out, don’t shoot it out,” said Sheriff Jewell Williams.

At the Juneteenth Parade, the message was enthusiastically received by a many of the parade participants and viewers: honored members of the historic Tuskegee Airmen, young drill team members, the Masonic Lodge, a contingent of renowned Buffalo Soldiers as well as international visitors to the city’s historic monuments. They will be the first to pass along the message for the Summer of Peace, 2018.

 

 

Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams and the Sheriff's Office Color Guard led the Philadelphia Juneteenth Parade in Center City Philadelphia on June 23 while launching his annual Philadelphia "Summer of Peace" message:

Let's Talk It Out. Don't Shoot It Out!

Sheriff Williams encourages young and old to stop violence in our community. Juneteenth is an annual festival to commemorate emancipation from slavery.

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This was written in English. For a translation, please visit Google Translate and select your language. 

Office of the Sheriff
Philadelphia City and County
Jewell Williams, Sheriff

 

Sheriff’s Office Reaches Philadelphia Communities as Summer Begins

 

The Office of the Sheriff will inform and help promote a safer summer for all Philadelphia residents by reaching out to communities across the city. This weekend, Sheriff Jewell Williams, staff and deputies distributed information about office services, gave away free gunlocks and were present to answer community questions at several events in various parts of the city:

 

  • The Northwest: Councilwoman Cindy Bass’ Community Day in Vernon Park, Saturday June 10
  • South Philly: Pennovation Center 2nd Annual Job Fair, 3401 Grays Ferry Ave, Saturday June 10
  • South Philly: 43rd Annual Odunde Festival, the nation’s largest African American street festival
  • Center City: Philly Pride Day, Celebrating Philadelphia’s LGBT Community at Penn’s Landing

Throughout the summer of 2018, the Sheriff’s Office will make it a priority to get free gunlocks into the hands of families with small children, using Philadelphia’s rich tradition of street and ethnic festivals and community outreach events to push a public safety message: Got a Gun, Get a Lock. Gunlocks have been proven to be an effective prevention device and protection against childhood accidental shootings.

The Sheriff is also determined to help citizens find out more about the operation of the Sheriff’s Office, about opportunities to buy properties at Sheriff’s Sales, and to give residents with questions about properties involved in the Sheriff Sale process a chance to find the answers they deserve.

 

The public is welcome to join us at Upcoming events on the Sheriff’s Office Summer Calendar which include:

 

  • Wednesday June 13, Keystone First Annual Spring Resource Fair, Renaissance Philadelphia Airport Hotel, 11:30am 
  • Wednesday June 13, Council President Clarke’s Seminar, “Tangled Title”, Love Zion Baptist Church, 2521 N. 23rd St, 6pm
  • Saturday, June 16th, Deliverance Evangelistic Church, 14th Annual Health Fair, 2001 West Lehigh Ave, 10am
  • Saturday, June 16th, 24th Police District Community Day 3399 Aramingo Avenue, Old Pathmark Parking Lot, 10am
  • Saturday, June 23, Juneteenth Parade and Freedom festival, Market Street Parade ending at Penn’s Landing, 12pm
  • Thursday June 28th, Strawberry Mansion Neighborhood Advisory Committee, Rebuilding Communities Fair, 6pm

 

For more information about the Sheriff ‘s Office, visit our website

www.phillysheriff.com

This editorial was originally published on Philadelphia Gay News at http://www.epgn.com/opinion/editorials/13333-survival-of-the-fittest

 

May 3, 2018

Kristen Demilio

This week, the Philadelphia Inquirer ran an article headlined, “Sheriff sale ads: A bonanza for the politically connected in Philly.” The paper is the city’s second-largest recipient of sheriff’s ads, at $1,613,157, only behind the Legal Intelligencer at $1,812,244 annually.

The articled conflated two issues: the private-contractor system by which sheriff’s ads are placed in Philadelphia-area publications, and the fact that minority news organizations receive those same ads.

PGN places sheriff’s ads in its pages through a relationship with political operative and ad broker Ken Smuckler. The Inquirer did not disclose its own relationship with Smuckler and his connection to Gerry Lenfest, the Inquirer’s funder.

But most important is how the Inquirer exploits a 1976 law for which it lobbied to enhance the paper’s own profits at the expense of minority and LGBT media.

The Inquirer benefits from the law, which requires that sheriff’s ads be placed in a general-interest newspaper and a local legal publication. But circulation rates in that general-interest paper have declined over the years and, in its place, smaller news outlets targeting specific populations have filled in the gaps of local, independent journalism, all while remaining profitable (as PGN is).

The substance of the Inquirer’s article looking at whether middle brokers are needed to replace ads is undermined by the snarky and dismissive tone the reporters used toward multicultural media outlets.

Despite the overwhelming advantages enshrined in the law, the Inquirer’s current survival is sustained not by paying customers, but by Lenfest literally donating The Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com to the Institute for Journalism in New Media so that it can receive funding beyond the sheriff’s ads.

PGN survives by its journalism. Why can’t the Inquirer?