News Story

22 nabbed in Valentine's Day warrant sweep

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. - February 14, 2013 (WPVI) -- The Philadelphia Sheriff's Office, along with other city and regional police agencies, rounded up dozens of suspects in a Valentine's Day warrant sweep.

The Action Cam was there early Thursday morning as police went to various homes in the city in search of the fugitives.

The suspects were wanted for everything from attempted murder, domestic violence, failure to pay child support and other crimes.

In all, nearly 300 people were targeted in the sweep.

The sweep is a Valentine's Day tradition for the sheriff's office, which has been conducted for 16 years.


Reported by Action News on February 14, 2013.

Phila. Sheriff’s Office Rounds Up Dozens Accused of Skipping Child Support Payments

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Twenty-two people are in custody today after an early morning sweep by the Philadelphia sheriff’s department for parents who haven’t paid child support.

But the sweep netted more than that.

Sheriff Jewell Williams says the sweep started about 2am and wrapped up five hours later. But instead of using just Philadelphia records, he says, the sweep included the surrounding counties using state police records.

“We found that there were other outstanding warrants — for burglary, robbery, theft, receiving stolen property, aggravated assault, simple assault,” he tells KYW Newsradio, “and we just included those other counties, and we found that we had people who were wanted for more than just not paying child support.”

Williams says some will have to serve time behind bars because they violated the child support agreement. And he says with apparent satisfaction that those who committed additional crimes will also be off the streets.


Reported by Kim Glovas of CBS Philly on February 14, 2012.

Sheriff Williams Shields Philadelphia’s Courthouses

The tragic killing of three people in the lobby of the New Castle Co. Courthouse in Wilmington, Del. is something the Office of the Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County tries actively to prevent, said Sheriff Jewell Williams.

Sheriff Williams said, “First of all, I want to offer my condolences and prayers to the families of those killed as well as those wounded in this horrific incident.”

He then stated, “The security and safety of the general public, judges, witnesses, defendants and the accused at the Criminal Justice Center, Traffic Court and Family Court here in Philadelphia are all our responsibility and we are constantly training our Deputy Sheriffs and reviewing our security at each.”

“Unfortunately, when someone with a gun is determined to use it, such a scenario is a challenge for even the best security,” he added.

The shootings in Wilmington occurred in the lobby of the county court house prior to people going through the metal detector. The lobby of the Criminal Justice Center in Philadelphia is constantly monitored by uniformed personnel who are trained to respond in an “active shooter” scenario.

“We expect to have a bike patrol (two) outside the perimeter of the CJC in a few days, and though we are down in personnel overall, we will continue to keep a uniformed presence in the outer perimeter of the building,” added Sheriff Williams.


Published by the Philadelphia Public Record on February 14, 2013.

Sheriff Office Staffer Named One of Delaware Valley's Most Influential Latinos

December 12, Philadelphia--Ana Sostre-Ramos, Director of Hispanic Community Affairs in the Office of the Philadelphia Sheriff has been named one of the 2012 Delaware Valley’s Most Influential Latinos by the Delaware Valley’s Most Influential Latinos Foundation.  

Deputy Sostre-Ramos joined the Office of the Sheriff, City and County of Philadelphia, in 1989 as a Special Deputy originally assigned security detail in the Domestic Court Unit of City of Philadelphia.   Later she served in Internal Affairs and the Real Estate Divisions in the Sheriff’s Office.

“I am humbled and very proud,” said Sostre-Ramos, “to be recognized by the Foundation for the services the Sheriff’s Office provides to the community.”  

Born in Yabuco, Purerto she ran track and field during her high school days.  She received her undergraduate degree in social work from Universidad del Sagrado Corazion in P.R.   She attended Temple University and was awarded a Deputy Sheriff certificate from Dickinson Law School.

She is a member of the Labor Council for Latin-American Advancement, serves on the annual Puerto Rican Day Parade Committee in Philadelphia and is a Red Cross Volunteer.

For the past seven years the Delaware Valley’s Most Influential Latinos Foundation has made its task to recognize individuals who have made great contributions to the Delaware Valley’s Latino community and the community at large. This year the awards dinner was held at the Hyatt Regency at Penn’s Landing in Philadelphia.

Philadelphia's new sheriff issues conflict-of-interest rules

Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams showed up at his first foreclosure sale Tuesday and unveiled an executive order to prohibit sheriff's employees or contractors, or their family members, from bidding on foreclosed properties.

"Right now my job is to clean this sheriff's office up, make sure we pass the smell test on everything that we do," Williams told reporters. "I don't think having employees bid on properties at this time is a good thing."

Too many employees in the Sheriff's Office have access to inside information that could be helpful at auctions, he said.

"Our mission is to make sure that the office is transparent, make sure that we're accountable to the public and to the folks who put their money in the Sheriff's Office to bid for properties," Williams said.

Asked for a copy of the executive order, Williams' spokeswoman, Harriet Lessy, provided the following text: "No employee . . . including deputies, administrative staff and/or contractors to the office, are permitted to bid on a property listed for sale today or at any time in the future. That includes, too, members of the immediate family of anyone employed or anyone that resides in the same household as anyone employed by the Office of the Sheriff."

On paper, the new restrictions are significantly stronger than those imposed by Sheriff John Green, who ran the office from 1988 until the end of 2010.

But they do not address the main conflict-of-interest questions that have plagued the sheriff's real estate operations: personal real estate transactions between the sheriff's real estate personnel and the mortgage companies and speculators who frequently buy properties at the sheriff's auctions.

In January 2006, shortly after a report in the Philadelphia Daily News questioned the personal real estate dealings of Darrell Stewart, who ran the sheriff's auctions, Green adopted a new policy prohibiting his real estate personnel from bidding on properties.

The prohibition extended to employees who processed legal documents or other paperwork related to sheriff's sales.

But Green allowed the rest of his employees to participate in the sheriff's auctions and decided it was OK for even his real estate personnel to buy properties from mortgage companies and speculators who pick up real estate at sheriff's sales.

Green retired at the end of 2010 and was replaced by his longtime chief of staff, Barbara Deeley. At the end of her first week in office, she transferred Stewart to a job working at the city prisons. He has since resigned.


Written by Bob Warner for the Philadelphia Inquirer on January 11, 2012.

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