Members of the Sheriff of Philadelphia's Bike Patrol Unit took to the streets of West Philadelphia to deliver bundles of toys on bikes and a truck that normally transports defendants back and forth to court was overflowing with bags of toys collected over several weeks by the Bike Unit and other employees of the Office of the Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County. The toys were delivered to the Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia for those patients unable to be in their own homes and beds over the holidays.

PHILADELPHIA, PA--The Office of the Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County is seeking to hire qualified individuals for the position of Deputy Sheriff Officer December 22nd through January 2nd, 2015.

 “Deputy Sheriff Officers are highly trained in both law enforcement and civil procedures needed for this challenging, and rewarding position”, said Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams.

 Potential deputies must also undergo background checks and pass written exams, physical, agility, and physiological tests before being considered for the position.

State law requires all candidates to pass a 19-week course at Penn State University.  

All potential hires must either live in the City of Philadelphia, or become a resident within six months of hire.

For more information, and to fill out the online application, visit the web site of the Office of the Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County at www.phillysheriff.com, or the City of Philadelphia’s web site at www.phila.gov.  (Look under the Personnel heading for the job description and access to an application).

Media contact: Joseph Blake at 215-686-3572

Philadelphia, Dec. 3—The Philadelphia Sheriff’s Bicycle Patrol Unit has put together a Holiday Toy Drive that starts today and runs through December 19th, 2014. The unit is seeking donations of new, unwrapped, infant and/or adolescent gifts for those children still hospitalized over the holidays.

 Whether it’s needles for tests, painful therapy, or simply being in a space that is not home, these children struggle daily through different illnesses and challenges, but they can still take part in the holiday spirit through the generosity of others eager to share their blessings of health, family, and home.

 “This is the time of year that usually brings smiles to the faces of children, joy to their hearts and hope for their futures,” said Jewell Williams, Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County.

“The fact the men and women of the Bike Unit have volunteered their time to collect gifts for these children does not surprise me, and, indeed, reinforces the same values of compassion and duty that is a constant throughout this office,” said Sheriff Williams.  “I salute them for their thoughtfulness.”

Gifts can be dropped off at boxes near the entrance of the following locations during regular business hours:

  • Juanita Kidd Stout Court/Criminal Justice Center - 1301 Filbert Street (toy drop off: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.)
  • Philadelphia Family Court – 1501 Arch Street (toy drop off hours:  7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. M-F)
  • Traffic Court – 8th and Spring Garden Street (toy drop off hours:  8:30 a.m. – 7 p.m.)
  • Office of Philadelphia Sheriff – 100 S. Broad Street – 5th Floor (toy drop off hours: 8:30 – 3:30 p.m.)

Suggested gifts include infant sound machines, bath toys, mobiles, and other crib toys.  Adolescent items could include model and craft kits, jewelry sets, watches, art supplies, bath items and make-up and manicure sets.

Media Contact (not for publication):  Joseph P. Blake (215) 686-3572

"We will stop domestic violence," said Sheriff Jewell Williams, "one man and one woman at time." The Sheriff spoke at the 100 Men Rally organized by the Lutheran Settlement House and held at Love Park on Saturday, October 18 in Center City Philadelphia.

The Sheriff urged that people "count to ten" instead of using hands to hurt our women, children or others. "Take a walk around the block, put your hands in your pocket" he said. Punching and bullying won't break the cycle but thinking before you act might. He urged that man or woman who have exhibited abusive behavior or grown up with it "seek help".....we must stop domestic violence, he said.

He urged the use of gun locks to prevent further damage and disruptions to any family.

Jewell Williams, the Sheriff of Philadelphia City and County, participated in the Hero Thrill Show on Saturday, September 20th. The mission of the Hero Thrill Show is to raise money to pay for the college tuition of children of Philadelphia Police Officers, Firefighters and Sheriff Officers killed in the line of duty.

Sheriff Jewell Williams joined several other politicians and dignitaries including Congressman Bob Brady, Mayor Michael Nutter, City Councilman Curtis Jones, members of the band Pieces of A Dream, as well as union officials and dozens of others at the kickoff of the National Night Out activities at 75th & Lansdowne Avenue.

The event on August 4th, 2014, kicked off dozens of other activities held across the city in recognition of the 30th Anniversary of National Night Out which began here in Philadelphia in 1984.

“The significance of National Night Out is much more than people turning on their porch lights, or sitting on their steps”, said Sheriff Williams.  “It is a national event that focuses on the spirit and sense of responsibility and accountability that makes a neighborhood worthy of the name, and enhances the quality of life for the individuals living there”.

Sheriff Williams also participated in activities at the Feltonville Boys & Girls Club, Parkside Association of Philadelphia, and the South of South Town Watch organization.

At any given time, and on any given day, it’s not unusual to see people camped out on the sidewalk with a cardboard sign requesting money, or walking around a busy intersection looking for a handout.

According to the signs, some are homeless, while others just need a few coins for something to eat. 

They are young and old, black and white, and include even a growing number of veterans in these ranks of the unfortunate.

In my position as Sheriff of the City and County of Philadelphia, it disturbs me to see any one forced to beg and/or sleep on the streets, and especially disturbing when they are veterans who have already sacrificed so much in service to their country.

Statistics say the number of homeless veterans will continue to rise as they return home from places like Afghanistan, Iraq, and any theater of engagement where their lives are under constant threat.

It is troubling on many levels to have served your country honorably as a member of the Armed Forces, only to return to challenges and hurdles that may have arisen as a result of that same service, especially if they were in combat situations.

Among the organizations doing outreach on the street level is the Utility Emergency Services Fund (UESF) Veterans Program that targets veterans and their families who are either homeless, or are at risk of losing their homes.

The program offers:

  • Housing needs assessments and goal setting
  • Benefits screening and enrollment
  • Temporary financial assistance

To qualify:

  • You must have served 24 continuous months, or the full period for which you were called to active duty
  • Be a member of a family in which the head of the household, or spouse of the head of the household is a Veteran
  • Cannot have been dishonorably discharged

Workers in the UESF Veterans Program literally drive around seeking out homeless veterans on the street, and have done intake interviews with homeless individuals as they rest on cardboard mats on the sidewalk.

The organizations motto is a simple one: “Keeping Vulnerable Families in Their Homes”.

So if you know a veteran, the spouse of a veteran, or someone living in the household of a veteran who is homeless or close to losing their home, please pass along the following information.

UESF Veterans Program
1617 JFK Boulevard
Suite 840
Philadelphia, PA  19103
(215) 814-6888
www.uesfacts.org



 

Philadelphia, July 14 -- Sheriff Jewell Williams announced today that for Fiscal Year 2014 the Sheriff’s Office increased its payment of delinquent taxes and fees to the City by 40-Percent over Fiscal Year 2013.

Delinquent taxes, water and gas bills are collected through monthly Mortgage Foreclosure and Tax Sales. In FY 2013 the office collected and turned over $27,500,000. In the fiscal year ending on June 30, 2014 the office collected and sent to the City of Philadelphia $45,160,648—an increase of $18.1 million.

The Sheriff attributed the added revenue in part to increases in the number of properties put up for sale. However, the majority of the increase was due to the efficiency of the new information technology system and the hiring of staff to conduct and process sales in a timely manner. After a year of development, this new computer system first became operational for the October 2013 auctions.

 “The principal mission of the Sheriff’s Office is to transport up to five hundred prisoners a day to and from Courts and to guard and protect everyone who uses the City’s nine Court facilities. However, as agents of the Court System we carry out duties directed by Court Order. One of the most complicated is holding Foreclosure and Tax Sales,” noted Sheriff Williams.

“There are some sales in which approximately 500 new properties are put up for auction”, he continued. “Over the course of a year about 7,500 new properties and liens are put up for sale and each property has to be processed, advertised, and posted. Once sold, the delinquencies owed to the City must be paid and a deed prepared for the new owner.”

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PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – A Deputy Sheriff who died back in 1982 trying to stop two men from robbing a bar in West Philadelphia now has a plaque dedicated in his honor, laid in the sidewalk in front of the Criminal Justice Center.

It’s the 266th Hero Plaque Dedication, but organizer James Binns notes Roy Fortson, Jr. was the first Philadelphia Deputy Sheriff to be killed in the line-of-duty, since the office was founded in 1750.

“He could have taken a pass. The law enforcement officer in him came out and he did engage them, but was shot five times and killed.”

His family is grateful for the recognition, including Fortson’s widow, Edna.

“My heart is overwhelmed. I feel the love that you showed my husband. As a servant of god, he did what he was required to do that night, not knowing that it would be his last.”

Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams says laying the plaque outside the Criminal Justice Center serves as a reminder of the challenges brave officers face, and that “we will never forget a fallen officer.”


Written by Steve Tawa for CBS News on June 1, 2014.