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June 23, 2018 — Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams and the Sheriff’s Office Color Guard helped to lead the Philadelphia Juneteenth parade and launched his annual “Summer of Peace” at the Juneteenth Festival this weekend.

The Sheriff is encouraging young people to stay away from all forms of violence. At “pop-ups” and outreach events throughout the summer, the Office will give away free gunlocks and offer children and adults an opportunity to take a “gun safety” pledge to make sure all firearms in the home are safely secured. On social media, the office is promoting an antiviolence message: “Let's talk it out. Don’t shoot it out”. Citizens of all ages and all parts of our city can help to spread the message through short videos that will be posted on the Sheriff Office Facebook pages.

“We all love the summer: the sunshine, vacations, barbeque, time with friends and family. But I want to encourage our young people to have a peaceful summer and stay away from the conflicts that lead to tragic and senseless violence. So let’s talk it out, don’t shoot it out,” said Sheriff Jewell Williams.

At the Juneteenth Parade, the message was enthusiastically received by a many of the parade participants and viewers: honored members of the historic Tuskegee Airmen, young drill team members, the Masonic Lodge, a contingent of renowned Buffalo Soldiers as well as international visitors to the city’s historic monuments. They will be the first to pass along the message for the Summer of Peace, 2018.

 

This was written in English. For a translation, please visit Google Translate and select your language. 

Office of the Sheriff
Philadelphia City and County
Jewell Williams, Sheriff

 

Sheriff’s Office Reaches Philadelphia Communities as Summer Begins

 

The Office of the Sheriff will inform and help promote a safer summer for all Philadelphia residents by reaching out to communities across the city. This weekend, Sheriff Jewell Williams, staff and deputies distributed information about office services, gave away free gunlocks and were present to answer community questions at several events in various parts of the city:

 

  • The Northwest: Councilwoman Cindy Bass’ Community Day in Vernon Park, Saturday June 10
  • South Philly: Pennovation Center 2nd Annual Job Fair, 3401 Grays Ferry Ave, Saturday June 10
  • South Philly: 43rd Annual Odunde Festival, the nation’s largest African American street festival
  • Center City: Philly Pride Day, Celebrating Philadelphia’s LGBT Community at Penn’s Landing

Throughout the summer of 2018, the Sheriff’s Office will make it a priority to get free gunlocks into the hands of families with small children, using Philadelphia’s rich tradition of street and ethnic festivals and community outreach events to push a public safety message: Got a Gun, Get a Lock. Gunlocks have been proven to be an effective prevention device and protection against childhood accidental shootings.

The Sheriff is also determined to help citizens find out more about the operation of the Sheriff’s Office, about opportunities to buy properties at Sheriff’s Sales, and to give residents with questions about properties involved in the Sheriff Sale process a chance to find the answers they deserve.

 

The public is welcome to join us at Upcoming events on the Sheriff’s Office Summer Calendar which include:

 

  • Wednesday June 13, Keystone First Annual Spring Resource Fair, Renaissance Philadelphia Airport Hotel, 11:30am 
  • Wednesday June 13, Council President Clarke’s Seminar, “Tangled Title”, Love Zion Baptist Church, 2521 N. 23rd St, 6pm
  • Saturday, June 16th, Deliverance Evangelistic Church, 14th Annual Health Fair, 2001 West Lehigh Ave, 10am
  • Saturday, June 16th, 24th Police District Community Day 3399 Aramingo Avenue, Old Pathmark Parking Lot, 10am
  • Saturday, June 23, Juneteenth Parade and Freedom festival, Market Street Parade ending at Penn’s Landing, 12pm
  • Thursday June 28th, Strawberry Mansion Neighborhood Advisory Committee, Rebuilding Communities Fair, 6pm

 

For more information about the Sheriff ‘s Office, visit our website

www.phillysheriff.com

Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office Collects $61 Million In Delinquent City Taxes in 2017-18

$250 Million In Delinquent Taxes Have Been Returned Between 2013 and 2017

PHILADELPHIA —Today, Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams testified at Philadelphia Budget Hearings, telling council members that the Sheriff’s Office collected and returned $61.3 million dollars in delinquent taxes and fees to the City general fund for The School District of Philadelphia and other city operations. In conjunction, the Sheriff’s office released an annual report of Sheriff Office activity, which accumulated the total of delinquent tax revenues, returned to the city treasury in the past five years. Since 2013, the Sheriff’s Office has generated nearly $250 million in revenues for the City. Part of this revenue is apportioned to the School District of Philadelphia. The Sheriff is the largest collector of delinquent taxes for the City.

“In the coming year, the office will pay to the City nearly three times our cost,” said the Sheriff’s budget testimony. More than $32 million will come from the collection of delinquent taxes and $13 million will come from delinquent water and gas charges. Other estimated earnings of $12 million will result from fees for various legal services for servicing writs and court orders and a$3.5 million worth of reimbursements from banks and attorneys.

The $61 million dollars in 2017-18 taxes and fees is nearly three times the cost of the operation of the Sheriff’s Office. The proposed budget for the 2018-2019 Fiscal Year is $24.5 million. It supports 408 employees including 314 uniform personnel. 54% or $596,000 is allocated for transporting and provisions for 87,030 prisoners in the care of the Sheriff’s Office. Sheriff’s Deputies now secure City Hall; training was completed for a new 40 officer warrant squad and both the bicycle and K9 units were expanded. Sheriff’s deputies served 4,412 warrants and approximately 300 Protection From Abuse orders. The Sheriff identified and returned a record $3.3 million dollars in excess recovery funds to individuals who lost their homes to foreclosure or tax delinquency.

Outreach and advertising served to greatly increase the number of participants in 4 monthly sheriff sales. The office conducted 36 seminars teaching citizens how to buy a property through Sheriff Sale. The attendance at these seminars has increased sharply, indicating more demand for properties and interest in this method of purchase. This year, 19,919 properties were ordered to Sheriff Sales; ultimately 5,936 properties were sold, others were stayed or postponed.

The Sheriff has also committed resources to a critical public safety outreach initiative: the office has distributed 5000 gunlocks to Philadelphia citizens in an effort to prevent childhood gun accidents in our homes.

Click here to download the 2017 Sheriff's Annual Report.

SHERIFF JEWELL WILLIAMS TESTIFIES BEFORE CITY COUNCIL ON HIS BUDGET.   Photo Credit:  Willard Rozier​

This was written in English. For a translation, visit Google Translate and select your language.

January 11, 2018—In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, many Philadelphians stepped forward to provide aid to the victims of the devastated island of Puerto Rico. On Martin Luther King Day, January 15, 2018, a group of these local heroes will be honored with the Martin Luther King Community Service Award at Zion Baptist Church’s annual King Day Worship service in North Philadelphia.

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(This was written in English. For a full translation, visit http://translate.google.com and select your language.)

Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office Conducts Holiday Gunlock Giveaway

Deputies distribute safety locks to prevent children from being wounded and/or killed in accidental shootings involving unsecured firearms

WHAT:   Citywide Holiday Gunlock Giveaways

WHO:   Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office Deputies

WHEN:   December 15th 2017 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

WHERE:            Broad & Chestnut Streets

52nd & Market Streets

22nd Street & Lehigh Avenue

Bridge & Pratt Streets

Broad Street & Olney Avenue

24th Street & Oregon Avenue

Background

Sheriff’s deputies will fan out across the city to pass out gun safety locks to Philadelphia residents and gun safety pledge cards to children to make them aware of the danger of firearms in general, and specifically unsecured firearms.   The gunlocks are free. 

Guns kill nearly 1300 American children every year.  In West Philadelphia, a three-year old girl shot herself in November after finding a loaded, unlocked gun belonging to her father.  It was the third accidental shooting involving children in the previous three months, including a three year old boy who accidently shot his uncle after finding a gun in the family car in Center City, and an 11 year old boy shot himself in the face in South Philadelphia.  

A 2014 report from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute cites the US General Accounting Office estimate that 31% of accidental firearms deaths could be prevented if gun owners used two devices:  a gunlock and a loading indicator.

“We know that some of these tragic events could have been prevented by making sure these firearms are secured and stored safely,” said Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams. “If you have a gun, you need a lock”.

The facts are: 

  •      1 in 3 homes with kids have guns
  •      In 2014, 2,549 children died by gunshot; 13.6 million were injured
  •      For children, 89% of unintentional shooting deaths occur in the home--most from playing with loaded guns in their parents absence
  •      1 in 3 handguns is kept loaded and unlocked and most kids know where their parents keep guns
  •      More than 75% of 1st and 2nd graders know where parents keep their guns and 36% admit they have handled the firearms. 
  •      80% of guns used in youth suicide attempts were kept in the homes of parents, relatives or friends. 

(Statistics from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Center for Injury Research and Prevention.  For full report, go to

https://injury.research.chop.edu/violence-prevention-initiative/types-violence-involving-youth/gun-violence/gun-violence-facts-and#.WifpC0yZPdQ )

The Sheriff’s Office, in conjunction with City Council President Darrell Clarke, have been giving away free gunlocks throughout 2016 and 2017.  No questions asked.  No ID required.  Philadelphia residents can pick up free gunlocks at the Sheriff’s Office any weekday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., 100 S. Broad Street on the 5th floor.

For more information call 215-686-3572 or visit www.phillysheriff.com.

This article was written in English. To translate, please visit http://translate.google.com.

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The sendoff is strong. The connection to the mission is even stronger.

For 21 days, four men from the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office will be in Puerto Rico helping with disaster relief.

Inspector Michael Bastone, Sergeant Joshua Perez, and Deputy Sheriff Officers Alessandro Carrasquillo and Enrique Marin each have ties to Puerto Rico.

“Words cannot explain the devastation,” Bastone said.

From Philadelphia, they watched helplessly as Hurricane Maria ravaged the island and have still been unable to reach some family members there.

After seeing that footage, Bastone, the office’s highest ranking Hispanic deputy, went directly to Sheriff Jewell Williams, who immediately gave the green light to send a team.

“These deputies’ input can save a life,” Williams said, “and that’s what this is about.”

With no place to stay and essential services like water and electricity scarce at best, Bastone says they have no idea what to expect.

“It’s definitely going to be a hardship for all of us,” he said. “It’s something we’ve never experienced. But we’re going out there and we’re going to do the best we can for our people.”

All four men have commercial driver’s licenses and were told they will be running essential supplies to hard hit, hard to reach locations.

“There will be days without bathing. There will be days without eating. We need to prepare with protein bars, with enough under clothes for the whole 21 days we’ll be out there deployed,” Bastone said. “And all this packing has to be in one bag, so you can only imagine how much we’re trying to get out there to survive.”

The group leaves on Sunday. Sergeant Joshua Perez is also making the trip to the city of Rio Piedras.

“It’s almost to the point where you have to question yourself whether or not you’re going into a safe environment, into a safe condition. But you have to look at the bigger picture. There are people who need our help. These are our people, these are American citizens that need us,” Perez said. “Medical supplies are very scarce. A lot of the barrios and a lot of the areas aren’t receiving the aid that they need.”

And though they’ll leave comfort behind, they hope to bring much healing and hope.

“Three weeks later we get to come home. But they still have to live there and deal with all of the devastation of the hurricane,” Perez said. “For me, it’s very heartfelt. I can’t even put into words how I feel. I just feel like it’s meant to be and I feel obligated to help my people as much as possible.”

Deputies Alessandro Carrasquillo and Enrique Marin are also making the trip.

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2017/10/14/4-philly-sheriffs-deputies-heading-to-puerto-rico-for-hurricane-relief-effort

There probably is no perfect scenario when a property is listed, by court
order, for a Sheriff Sale. Most often it means a family may be losing their
home for a variety of reasons, often because of illness, job loss or other
situations that may be out of their control.

One benefit to Philadelphia residents is that the majority of new buyers that
purchase property at Sheriff Sales pay real estate taxes and keep them
current according to a sample review undertaken by the Philadelphia
Sheriff’s Office.

Sheriff Jewell Williams sought to determine the degree that properties
subjected to Sheriff Sale by order of the First Judicial District become and
remain tax compliant. The Sheriff’s Office reviewed the tax status of all
properties sold at the mortgage foreclosure, tax delinquent, and tax lien
sales for the months of November 2016 and November 2015.
City records indicate that 344 or 73% of the 469 properties sold in
November 2016 were current on their city 2017 real estate property tax.
That is a significant boost to the city revenue stream.

Tax records indicate that only 316 of the 471 properties sold in November
2015 were compliant in paying real estate taxes for 2016 and 2017. From
that small sampling we are able to see that 660 properties returned to
being tax compliant and current after years of dereliction of obligation to the
city and the school district.

In addition to recovering private and public debts, the purpose of the Sheriff
Sale is to return tax delinquent properties to the tax rolls. Because tax
delinquent properties receive city services such as police and fire
protection and trash pickup they are a burden to the City and often a blight
to its neighborhood.

In Pennsylvania the Sheriff Sales are the last step in the process to collect
delinquent debts including taxes and utility fees. Properties are brought to
Sheriff Sale through the courts requested by lenders and taxing authorities
who are owed money. If the owner does not make arrangements to satisfy
the debt, the property is sold at a court ordered public auction handled by
the Sheriff. The purchaser is expected to pay real estate and other city and
county obligations going forward and must be tax compliant with the city for
one year prior to the purchase.

The goal of this analysis was to get a sense of how many properties sold
through a Philadelphia Sheriff sale returned to fulfilling tax obligations.

18 de julio, Filadelfia, Pensilvania - En los últimos doce meses la Oficina del Sheriff de Filadelfia recibió $61.3 millones en impuestos atrasados ​​y cargos recaudados de las Ventas del Sheriff. En el año fiscal 2012, el año en que el Sheriff Jewell Williams entró en funciones, sólo se habían recaudado 27 millones de dólares.

Este es el tercer año consecutivo que el Sheriff remitió más de $60 millones a la Ciudad de Filadelfia. El dinero se recauda a través de ventas hipotecarias de hipoteca mensual, impuesto de morosidad y las ventas de gravamen fiscal, así como las tasas impuestas por diversos servicios relacionados con la corte. Las propiedades se llevan a Sheriff Sales a través de órdenes judiciales iniciadas por los Departamentos de Ingresos y Ley de la Ciudad o por bancos y prestamistas privados.
% U201C Durante muchos años, la recaudación de impuestos morosos había sido un problema. A menudo las propiedades que vendemos son delincuentes durante cinco o más años. Esperamos ver el atraso de las propiedades delincuentes de impuestos disminuyen,% Williams Williams dijo.

Bajo Williams, la Oficina rediseñó el proceso de recolección de delincuentes e instaló un sistema de gestión de datos. A petición de la Ciudad, se agregaron dos ventas mensuales adicionales al calendario durante el último año fiscal.

La misión principal de la Oficina del Sheriff es proteger a los que trabajan en nuestros Tribunales y otros tales como testigos, jurados y para transportar y custodiar a los presos que van y vienen de la Corte y para llevar a cabo órdenes judiciales.

El Sheriff ahora provee al Tesoro de la Ciudad casi tres veces lo que cuesta operar la oficina. Para el año fiscal 2018, que comenzó en julio, el presupuesto del Sheriff% u2019s es de $ 23 millones.