Congratulations to our newest Deputy Sheriff Officers, who were sworn-in Monday by Sheriff Jewell Williams.

This class of officers is named in honor of late Sheriff’s Office Inspector Michael Saia.

These six deputies are the first of nearly 50 new officers being hired by the Sheriff’s Office this year. The next group of deputies will be sworn-in in June.

Sheriff Williams is pictured along with the new deputies as well as Chief Inspector Jennifer Algarin-Barnes and Deputy Chief Paris Washington.

Sheriff Jewell Williams displayed 70 firearms seized this week from one household when a protection from abuse order was served upon an individual in Philadelphia.

“We have taken over 70 guns out of a household where a protection from abuse order was served. We are a 24/7 operation. We protect the community by taking these weapons off the street,” said Sheriff Jewell Williams.

“I want to thank the Sheriff and the Sheriff’s Office for being great allies in getting guns off the street from dangerous offenders in Philadelphia,” said Mike Gallagher, police liaison for Women Against Abuse.

Williams and Gallagher spoke alongside a display of firearms.

This massive haul from one individual represents a fraction of the weapons the Sheriff’s Office is responsible for securing.

Recently, Act. 79, Pennsylvania House Bill 2060 went into effect which changed the rules governing the surrender of firearms and other weapons by people served with Protection from Abuse orders. More weapons will now be surrendered to law enforcement, and the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office is the primary custodian of weapons surrendered or seized.

Inventoried weapons are secured by the Sheriff’s Office and may be returned to the owner following a court order authorizing the individual to retrieve their firearms.

SHERIFF’S OFFICE HELPS DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION COLLECT UNWANTED MEDICATIONS FOR NATIONAL TAKE-BACK EVENT SAT. APRIL 27.

Deputies from the Philadelphia Sheriff’s Office will be on-hand at two prescription medication collection sites from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 27, 2019.

The officers will assist the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) National Takeback Initiative, which asks people to drop off expired, or unwanted prescription medications, no questions asked, at the District Office of Council President Darrell Clarke (2815 Ridge Avenue) and at the 18th Street Apothecary Pharmacy (113 S. 18th Street.).

Proper disposal helps to avoid misuse, abuse and overdoses of these drugs often stored in home medicine cabinets. They are a leading cause of accidental poisoning for children and may also be harmful for adults. Flushed or trashed medications can end up polluting our waters. Any medications collected will be safely disposed of or destroyed by the DEA.

Image result for dea national take back 2019

Original article by Jeff Gammage can be found here: https://www.philly.com/news/ice-immigration-immigrants-courts-arrests-sheriffs-department-20190405.html

Federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement authorities have agreed to halt arrests of migrants inside Philadelphia courthouses, as part of an accord that defines how agents may enter and act in the halls of justice, according to the Sheriff’s Department.

The new procedure, to take effect Monday, requires plainclothes ICE agents to identify themselves to sheriff’s deputies at the front-door security stations, to reveal whether they are armed, and to state where in the building they intend to go. Those deputies will alert their supervisors, who could contact the judge in the courtroom to which the agent is headed, said Sheriff’s Deputy Chief Paris Washington.

ICE officials said they could not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The new guidelines come five days after The Inquirer reported on a March 21 incident in which an ICE agent, dressed in a Muhammad Ali T-shirt in a Criminal Justice Center courtroom, flashed a badge at a public defender and asked the lawyer about his client.

Read more ...

We are saddened to acknowledge and mourn the passing of two members of the Sheriff’s Office family. We salute their commitment to the highest level of service and dedication to their duties.

Sgt. Michael Jesus, who served in the Warrant Unit, has been a Deputy Sheriff Officer since 1997. Michael achieved the rank of Sergeant in 2016 and is a second generation law enforcement officer; his father, Joseph Jesus also served in the Sheriff’s Warrant Unit before him.

DSO Saberta Campbell recently retired from the Sheriff’'s office , having served as a Deputy in the Justice Juanita Kidd Stout Center for Criminal Justice for the past 23 years. Prior to her appointment as Deputy Sheriff Officer, Ms. Campbell served proudly as a Correctional Officer for the Philadelphia Department of Prisons.

 

 

This article by was originally posted at http://www.phillytrib.com/news/local_news/annual-mlk-day-luncheon-honors-those-fighting-for-justice-voting/article_ecf080d2-b3b2-51c9-b422-9b177e64be68.html

As the nation honored the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Philadelphia Martin Luther King, Jr. Association for Nonviolence held its annual Awards and Benefit Luncheon on Monday. The organization honored local community leaders and activists with its annual “Drum Major” awards.

The “Drum Major” awards are named in honor of King’s famous 1968 “Drum Major Instinct” speech, which was the last high-profile speech of his life and when he famously said that he “hoped to be a drum major for peace.” The honorees were recognized for their philanthropic and community service in the Philadelphia community.

This year’s honorees included Philadelphia Sheriff Jewell Williams and Laborers International of North America Local Union 332 Business Manager Samuel Staten, Radio One Founder and CEO Cathy Hughes, and 97-year-old New Jersey election worker Laura Wooten. 

“When you’re a 97-year-old Black woman, [voting] is a topic where you have a lot to say,” said Wooten, a native of Princeton, New Jersey. She worked her first election in 1939 at the age of just 18, and has worked every election since.

“You know that elections matter,” she said. “And — God willing — I’ll be right there at the Lawrence Road firehouse helping out at the polls in 2020.”

Previous “Drum Major” honorees include Joe Frazier, J. Whyatt Mondesire, Sheryl Lee Ralph, Cicely Tyson, Nelson Mandela, Dick Gregory, Rosa Parks and Donald “Ducky” Birts.

Other 2019 honorees included Ken Harbin and Gina Ross, who were honored for their 14 and 12 years respectively with the organization with the C. Delores Tucker Volunteer Award. The organization was founded by the late activist in 1983.

A number of elected officials also attended the luncheon, including Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and Democratic U.S. Sen. Bob Casey. 

“When I think of Martin Luther King, the one word I think of is justice,” Casey said. “By commemorating his legacy; by fighting for justice every day of the year — not just on MLK Day — you pay tribute to his legacy for fighting for justice.”

Casey noted the Martin Luther King Jr. Association for Nonviolence could not hold its annual ceremonial ringing of the Liberty Bell because the bell was closed due to the government shutdown. The senator spoke during the luncheon and had a pointed message to Donald Trump regarding the ongoing.

“This shutdown could end tomorrow morning when I go back to Washington,” Casey said, taking Republican Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell to task. “We can talk for a long time after the government’s open, about border security or anything else. The House did its job and acted responsibly.

“Now you have the leader of the Senate Republicans in league with the President, who shut the government down, so now you only have two people who can open this government,” he added. “Pass the bill in the Senate and open the government first and get the people back to work.”

Sheriff Jewell Williams and members of the Sheriff’s Office distributed toys at the Veterans Multi-Service Center in Old City on December 20, 2018. The toys were collected by Sheriff’s Office throughout the holiday season at the Sheriff’s Office, Criminal Justice Center, Family Court, Traffic Court as well as two partnered toy drives at multiple Five Below stores throughout Philadelphia. Toys are distributed to local schools and pre-schools as well as the Veterans Service Center.